THU JULY 02, 2:00PM

GOVERNOR'S COVID-19 UPDATE ON SCHOOL GUIDELINES AND HEALTH ADVISORY SYSTEM

THU AND FRI JULY 02 AND 03 

VIRTUAL NEA REPRESENTATIVE ASSEMBLY

SAT JULY 04

Independence Day

WED JULY 15

NEW SWOEA OFFICERS AND ZONE REPRESENTATIVES TAKE OFFICE

SUN JULY 26 

OEA COMMITTEES

SUN AND MON JULY 26 AND 27

BOARD OF DIRECTORS' RETREAT

TUE JULY 28

OEA BOARD OF DIRECTORS

WED AUGUST 05, 01:00PM

VIRTUAL EXPERIENCED TREASURERS' WORKSHOP

WED AUGUST 05, 03:00PM

VIRTUAL NOVICE TREASURERS' WORKSHOP

WED AUGUST 05, 03:00PM

LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE

SWOEA Office

MON AUGUST 24, 05:30

OFFICERS COMMITTEE

SWOEA Office

MON AUGUST 31, 05:00

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

SWOEA Office

NEWS & EVENTS

UPCOMING EVENTS

 
GOVERNOR DEWINE ANNOUNCES NEW GUIDANCE FOR REOPENING SCHOOLS IN THE FALL

On July 2, 2020, Ohio Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor Jon

Husted announced the new guidance for resuming school in the fall

in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

"We know that each school system, and perhaps each school

building, will likely look different in the fall.  We also know that

Ohio has a long history of local control and that school

administrators and teachers know their schools best," said

Governor DeWine. "Working together and consulting with educators

and other health officials, we have developed a set of guidelines,

backed by science, that each school should follow when developing

their reopening plans."

The newly issued guidance report advises schools to vigilantly assess symptoms, wash and sanitize hands to prevent spread, thoroughly clean and sanitize the school environment to limit spread on shared surfaces, practice social distancing, and implement a face coverings policy. 

"Just as we have done in the business sector with employees, we are requiring school staff to wear face coverings to reduce the spread of the virus, unless it is unsafe or when doing so could significantly interfere with the learning process.  When face coverings aren’t practical, face shields may be considered," said Governor DeWine. "We strongly recommend that students in 3rd grade and up wear face coverings as well."  

More details on the new school guidance will soon be available on coronavirus.ohio.gov.

To assist schools in their efforts to implement the guidance, the Ohio Department of Education has created a document titled, “The Reset and Restart Education Planning Guide for Ohio Schools and Districts,” which is                                                                                                                  designed to help teachers, principals, and                                                                                                                      administrators with solutions to safety                                                                                                                          challenges.  The document provides resources                                                                                                              and information for community decision-                                                                                                                    makers as they contemplate how to reopen                                                                                                                  safely.

                                                                                                             The guidance announced today was developed                                                                                                              in consultation with school superintendents,                                                                                                                teachers, parents, the Ohio Federation of                                                                                                                        Teachers, Ohio Education Association, Ohio                                                                                                                  Association of Public School Employees,                                                                                                                          Buckeye Association of School Administrators,                                                                                                              Ohio School Boards Association, Ohio                                                                                                                              Association  of School Business Officials, Alliance for High Quality Education, and Ohio Association of Career Tech Education.

Governor DeWine also committed to working with the Ohio General Assembly on a plan to ensure that federal CARES Act dollars are made available to Ohio’s school districts for unforeseen expenses associated with creating a safe environment. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
OEA PRESIDENT SCOTT DIMAURO'S WEEKLY ADDRESS

(Note: This address was made on July 1, 2020, prior to the announcement above). As we approach the 4th of July holiday, we’re all anticipating Governor Mike DeWine’s announcement, expected tomorrow, on the parameters for reopening schools.  He is signaling that there will be a significant degree of local control; we are pushing hard to ensure clear and strong public health guidance from the state that will keep members and students safe.  (Check out these news stories from WSYX Channel 6 and WBNS Channel 10 where I laid out our concerns last evening.)  

 

As local districts roll out reopening plans, your advocacy at the local level is critical, so soon after the Governor makes his announcement, be on the lookout for guidance from NEA and OEA on how you can use the power of your local union to effectively advocate for health and safety and equitable education opportunities for your students.  In the meantime,  our local presidents’ Zoom call today at noon when we will be discussing this issue and answering your questions.

 

This year’s NEA Representative Assembly is taking place virtually this week. I appreciate all of you who are participating as delegates and/or sending delegates to represent your local this year. Please support our delegates by giving generously to the NEA Fund for Children and Public Education as we work to show Betsy DeVos the door in November. In the meantime, I continue to need your help in contacting our U.S. Senators to avoid tens of thousands of potential educator job cuts – click here for more information and to take action.

 

Thank you for all you’re doing this summer to continue fighting for our members, students and public education.

 

In solidarity,

Scott DiMauro

President

Ohio Education Association

225 E. Broad Street, Box 2550

Columbus, OH  43216-2550

614-227-3177 (office); 614-596-0544 (mobile)

www.ohea.org

Screen Shot 2020-07-02 at 9.09.07 AM.png

 
SAFELY CELEBRATING THE FOURTH OF JULY THIS YEAR

The Fourth of July, also known as Independence Day, has been a federal holiday in the

United States since 1941, but the tradition of Independence Day celebrations goes back to

the 18th century and the American Revolution. On July 2nd, 1776, the Continental Congress

voted in favor of independence, and two days later delegates from the 13 colonies adopted

the Declaration of Independence, a historic document drafted by Thomas Jefferson. From

1776 to the present day, July 4th has been celebrated as the birth of American independence,

with festivities ranging from fireworks, parades and concerts to more casual family

gatherings and barbecues, (from History.com). 

For most Americans, the Fourth of July is going to look a lot different this year. Due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, many cities and states have decided to cancel their annual parades, festivals, and fireworks displays, along with closing picnic areas and park pavilions to discourage crowds from gathering.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is also urging people to take necessary safety precautions this Independence Day. Addressing the recent spike in coronavirus cases, Robert Redfield, director of the CDC, said, "For the Fourth of July, which is a family event, we want to emphasize that it’s really important that we get back to being vigilant as our collective commitment ... to protect vulnerable friends, family, community."

While you may not be able to attend the usual festivities or gather with friends and neighbors to watch fireworks, there are still ways to celebrate the Fourth of July while social distancing and following the CDC's guidelines for preventing the further spread of COVID-19. Whether it's finding a safe way to go see fireworks or hosting a backyard barbecue that doesn't put yourself or others at risk, below are our top tips for enjoying the holiday responsibly this year amid the global pandemic.

Many fireworks displays across the country have been cancelled in an attempt to prevent crowds. However, some cities are still setting off fireworks, albeit a bit differently than pre-coronavirus. A few are offering "drive-in" displays—where people are asked to park and remain in their cars for the show—while others are advising people to watch the fireworks from less-crowded, socially-distant spots rather than gathering in one area. If you're in an area with others, stay a safe six feet away and always wear a cloth face cover per the CDC's recommendations. (Our experts have spent the last few months tracking all of the top places to buy face masks online and have even tested the most popular ones to find the 10 best face masks out there.)

If the fireworks in your area have been cancelled—or if you don't feel comfortable going out in public—you can still participate in the festivities virtually from the comfort of your own home. A few displays will be live-streamed on the Fourth, including Macy's annual fireworks in New York (which you can watch on NBC) and the D.C. fireworks (which you can watch on PBS). Some cities have also announced that they will stream their fireworks displays on local news networks for residents who opt to stay home.

                                                                                                                    If you want to have a backyard barbecue or get-together at home this Fourth of July,                                                                                                                               the CDC has released guidelines for how to do so safely. The agency recommends staying                                                                                                                       outside if possible (and if not, using a well-ventilated indoor space) and limiting the                                                                                                                               number of people at your gathering. Ask that your guests wear a cloth face mask and                                                                                                                             encourage social distancing by placing tables and chairs a safe six feet apart.

                                                                                                                    Additionally, the CDC advises that you and your guests wash or sanitize your hands                                                                                                                               before and after eating and that you disinfect any commonly touched surfaces—like                                                                                                                             tables, counters, seat covers, etc.—regularly. If you can, opt for touchless garbage cans                                                                                                                           and wear disposable gloves when cleaning up or taking out the trash.

                                                                                                                    As for the food, the CDC suggests having guests bring their own dining ware (plates, cups,                                                                                                                     napkins, utensils) to avoid potentially spreading the virus. You can also ask guests to bring their own food and drinks or, if you want to provide it, skip the buffet and instead opt for single-serve portions (like individual snack bags and bottles). According to the CDC, you should also have one single person grilling or serving food to prevent multiple people from handling food or shared utensils.

Before your celebration comes to a close, the CDC also recommends writing down all of the guests in attendance in case you need it for contract tracing in the future. And, of course, thoroughly clean and disinfect anything that was used during the party afterwards, (from usatoday.com).

 

 

 

 
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. CONTEST WINNERS

Team SWOEA judged entries for the MLK Contest and maintaining Human and Civil Rights work. For the MLK

contest there were 115 entries; amazed at the students’ work. Times are changing and we have Great Future

Leaders!

 

Congratulations to the Grand Prize Winner Jabari Ashford from Fairfield Senior

High School; and

 

Amy Whitlng, Mason Education Association, and her students Landon Richey

and Kamilla Useche. 

 

 

 

 

Address:
270 Northland Blvd. Suite 224
Cincinnati, Ohio 45246

Email: sec-swoea@cinci.rr.com

Tel: 513-771-3319; 800-346-2175

Fax: 513-771-6674

  • b-facebook